‘Get Out,’ or ‘The Modern Frankenstein’

Lesley Thulin // In the director’s commentary for Get Out (2017), Jordan Peele evokes the literary tradition of British Romanticism to describe what it’s like to be Black in America. “This movie is sort of meant to be my take on Frankenstein,” he explains. As an updated Gothic captivity narrative that incorporates a version of…

Healing House II

    Darian Goldin Stahl, Artist-in-Residence // Healing House II Beeswax, silk, and sewing bust 2018   This installation materializes the feeling of unease that occurs when witnessing the dissolution of one’s flesh through biomedical imaging technologies. The penetrating waves of magnetic resonance slice and cast off the patient’s skin to uncover a lesion, and…

Laughing at Death – Part 2: When the Dying Tell Jokes

James Belarde “My wallpaper and I are fighting a duel to the death. One of us has got to go.” -Oscar Wilde, shortly before succumbing to illness In Mumbai, India, a kind-looking elderly woman sits on a stool behind a microphone and calmly quips “Life is like that TV journalist Arnab Goswami. Never take it…

Event: Hysteria from the Archives, Feb. 19

Coffee Hour, Poetry Reading, and Discussion of Hysteria from the Archives Monday, February 19, 2018, 4:00-5:00pm Heyman Center for the Humanities, Second Floor Common Room We have access to accounts of hysteria more or less exclusively through the male gaze of the physician. In response, Hysteria from the Archives engages with both phenomenology (the experiences…

Speculative bodies of the present in hormonal fictions

Kathryn Cai Recently, a series of English language novels that foreground the female body reimagine and transform their hormonal traffic from biologies linked with environmental illness to speculative imaginations of diffused, inchoate influence and overt physical and political power. As studies note, the female body’s hormonal complexities render its porous interactions with the environment particularly…

My Graphic Medicine Journey (Part Three)

The life course being a journey with various obstacles to overcome, and lessons to be learned, is a prevalent metaphor that has achieved almost mythic status. The anthropologist Ronald Grimes claims that ‘we do not escape metaphors, myths, and rituals; we only change them’ (146). Over the course of my previous two posts (Part 1,…

My Graphic Medicine Journey (Part Two)

Referencing Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey, the first part of this post discussed humanity’s predisposition towards metaphors of journey and quest, and the possible application (as well as troubling) of these metaphors, against my own experience of chronic illness, academia, and comics.